Surveys have shown that some people fear public speaking more than death. Have you ever noticed the amount of time and effort people spend trying to combat fear, nervousness, and self-doubt? From meditation and counseling to self-help books and motivational seminars, Americans spend millions of dollars every year trying to overcome performance-related anxiety.

It’s not surprising that the number one thing that worship leaders tell me when I ask them about their challenges is often the most difficult hindrance to overcome, likely because it’s the most personal.

Insecurity.

Insecurity includes fear in social situations, uncertainty, timidity, anxiety, second-guessing one’s self, nervousness, inhibition, and more. It can be defined as the absence of peace in one’s heart due to a lack of confidence.

Worship leading is arguably the most vulnerable position in a church. Click To Tweet

Insecurity is an issue for all of us from time to time. Worship leaders, singers, and musicians are not immune to its effects. It would be wrong to assume that because people stand up on a platform on a regular basis that they must not struggle with feelings of insecurity.

As a worship leader, it’s important that you watch for insecurity on your team and learn how to address it when it becomes apparent. But you also need to assess your own level of insecurity and confront it.

As a worship leader, it’s important that you watch for insecurity on your team and learn how to address it when it becomes apparent. Click To Tweet

Worship leading is arguably the most vulnerable position in a church. You’re using your gifting to draw people into worshipping Jesus. It’s only natural to feel some insecurity around your role as a worship leader.

You may have insecurity regarding singing, playing your instrument, leading your team on stage, leading your own songs, speaking in front of your team, or other dynamics of team leadership such as turning away people who audition for your team, addressing conflicts, or letting someone go from the team.

The first step in addressing your personal insecurity is determining exactly what is making you feel insecure. Is it a lack of confidence in your singing skills or playing ability? Maybe you’re reluctant to address issues like negative speech or chronic lateness. Or maybe you feel nervous trying to lead a Bible study or organize a social gathering with your team.

The Lord is willing and able to help and heal the wounds that are causing insecurity. Click To Tweet

Pinpointing the specific source(s) of your insecurity is much more helpful than just sensing a generalized anxiety about being a leader.

It’s also helpful to look back at your past experiences to determine when the seed of insecurity was planted. Were you belittled growing up and told you would never be successful? Were your early musical endeavors met with criticism or ridicule? Maybe you’ve been in a hurtful relationship that’s left you struggling to trust. Whatever the case, we all have wounds that can cause insecurity, but the good news is that the Lord is willing and able to heal and help us.

Seeking inner healing from past hurts is not a one-time pursuit. Throughout our lives, we need to be inviting the Lord in to heal our wounds and set us free of hindrances. If insecurity seems to plague you, ask the Lord what its sources are. There are many great books, online resources, support groups, and programs that can help you find the healing you need to be able to move forward into your calling as a worship leader.

Insecurity is something that everyone struggles with at times. Don’t be shocked by it. Face it. Ask God to help you. Click To Tweet

In summary, insecurity is something that everyone struggles with at times. Don’t be shocked by it. Face it. Ask God to help you.

Because insecurity is a such a vast topic, I want to take my next two blog posts to unpack where it comes from and why, as well as ways my worship team and I have tried to handle it. For now, I’d love to hear any thoughts you have below. Do you struggle with insecurity? If not, how have you overcome it?

Huge thanks to my friend Jordan Vanderplate for letting me use this photo of Banff National Park. Check out more of his work here.


I’m Justin Rizzo. I’m a worship leader, songwriter, and recording artist. I want to help you achieve your highest potential and walk out with confidence everything you’ve been made for.









4 comments

  1. Sekou Gaidi

    That’s the weird thing about me, Justin. I can lead a song just fine. In fact, that is my comfort zone in the church house…on stage, leading a song and playing with the other voices in my choir to perfect the sound and administer the Word better and better each time. My issue is this: our piano players are going in and out, and are often tied up on Sunday. I can play, I can accompany myself and others, but our usual piano player is amazing and classically trained. I suppose I’m asking for prayer, prayer and advice as well, because I want to step up and take more of a role in church but the better I get the more I am aware of what I don’t know and can’t do yet. Thank God for Jesus, you know, because Our Lord seems to perfect the called, He doesn’t call the perfect. Just asking for prayer, strength and support, and an encouraging word is always helpful. Thank you in advance and keep sharing your knowledge!

    1. Justin Rizzo

      Sekou, thanks so much for opening up and sharing this. I know this challenge and can relate. I encourage you to just keep at it. You don’t have to be the best at something – but just continue growing and developing as the Lord uses you. Praying blessings upon your leadership!