It is important to recognize that community isn’t just a nice idea; it’s God’s design.

Not only will you accomplish more as a group than as an individual, you’ll also bear greater fruit when you pool your gifts and talents and learn to use them together in unity. Your ministry will be more effective and far-reaching because your combined talents will result in greater blessing, encouragement, and effectiveness.

My “overly” simple working definition of community is simply getting people to talk. I see community as a group of individuals opening up their hearts and sharing with one another. Whether it’s a deep discussion about our inward thoughts and struggles or a casual dialogue about our favorite food or the latest sporting event, the goal is connecting with one another, and that happens through conversation.

Isolation leads to loneliness and produces a group of individuals each tending to their own tasks rather than a cohesive team ministering as a unit. Click To Tweet

Without deep, authentic relationships, a team feels less like a family and more like a group of co-workers. Isolation leads to loneliness and produces a group of individuals each tending to their own tasks rather than a cohesive team ministering as a unit. Simply put, we all need the encouragement and camaraderie that only our teammates can provide. Don’t underestimate the importance of real human relationships in the midst of your ministry assignments.

Don’t underestimate the importance of real human relationships in the midst of your ministry assignments. Click To Tweet

Have you ever considered why a 4X100m relay record is faster than four times the 100m record? The relay is accomplished by a team of runners, each passing a baton to the next. Instead of each runner starting from zero and having to build up speed on his own, each takes advantage of momentum and builds on the efforts of the ones before him.

Burnout is avoided when we have a group of like-minded companions spurring each other on, like iron sharpening iron. Click To Tweet

The same concepts can apply to community in the context of a worship team. We run farther and faster when we run together. There is security in community; where I am weak, my teammate is strong and vice-versa. When one falls down, the others pick him up.

Burnout is avoided when we have a group of like-minded companions spurring each other on, like iron sharpening iron. The fact that we work better in community is not a sign of weakness; but rather a sign of great strength.

How is the community on your worship team? I’d love to hear from you below.

Huge thanks to my friend Jordan Vanderplate for letting me use this photo of Folly Theatre, Kansas City. Check out more of his work here.


I’m Justin Rizzo. I’m a worship leader, songwriter, and recording artist. I want to help you achieve your highest potential and walk out with confidence everything you’ve been made for.









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