I’ll be honest. When I started leading worship, training weaker singers and musicians was not at the top of my to-do list.

I was mostly interested in finding as many talented people as possible to work with. Though I never said it, my actions were saying that I didn’t have time to train or invest in others.

Now, over twenty years later, I have a very different opinion.

Take it from me—you don’t have time to NOT invest in them.

WORSHIP LEADERS: Your team isn’t primarily there to make you sound good or look good. Your main job is to serve, and many times that looks like taking on a younger, less talented individual to invest in and raise up. Click To Tweet

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to sound as good as possible and pursuing excellence on your team. But contrary to what you may think, your team isn’t primarily there to make you sound good or look good. Your job is to serve, and sometimes that means taking on a younger, less talented individual to invest in and raise up.

It’s easy to slip into the if you’re not good enough for my team, you’re not worth my time mentality. Don’t go there. If you’re a worship leader, you’ve been given a place of leadership. Other singers and musicians are looking up to you. Sow into them.

Even if the standard of excellence to play on your stage is high, there are still other avenues you can have set up to always be sowing into weaker musicians and singers.

I’ve found it incredibly helpful for the long-term health of my team to have each person on my team consistently be pouring into someone less skilled. Click To Tweet

I’m not saying you have to take every singer or musician who knocks on your door. But part of your calling as a worship leader is to build up and strengthen those around you. I’ve found it incredibly helpful for the long-term health of my team to have each person on my team consistently be pouring into someone less skilled.

Many times, God’s invitation for you to grow into the amazing, anointed leader you dream of being looks like bringing people to your door and giving you opportunities to serve them.

The greatest worship leader is one who serves.

WORSHIP LEADERS: The greatest worship leader is one who serves. (Mt. 23:11) Click To Tweet

Huge thanks to my friend Jordan Vanderplate for letting me use this photo of Banff National Park. Check out more of his work here.


I’m Justin Rizzo. I enable worship leaders who feel isolated, overworked, and unfocused to experience peace, confidence and create thriving worship communities.









4 comments

  1. Thank you so much –
    This is really encouraging, and so important for the life, growth & future of worship ministry in the Body –

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