In my last post, Is Your Passivity Killing Your Worship Team, I shared about how it’s so easy for leaders to coast and not deal with issues or challenges on their teams.

As a leader, you should always seek to be honest and open with your team about challenges that may arise and ways they can grow.

Your passive communication or silence has way more potential to hurt someone than your open, honest communication spoken in a spirit of love. Click To Tweet

Sometimes you don’t want to be completely open with a member of your team because you’re afraid of hurting the persons feelings. But actually, the exact opposite is true.

Your passive communication or silence has way more potential to hurt someone. People long for and thrive where healthy, open, honest communication is given in a spirit of love.

7 side effects of unhealthy, passive communication:

1. People will feel unsafe under your leadership.

2. People will get hurt by you.

3. People will get hurt by other team members who are bold and aggressive.

4. People will not respect you as a leader.

5. People will be encouraged in withdrawal behaviors.

6. People will fail you because you haven’t communicated your expectations clearly or regularly enough.

7. People will see your silence as indifference or acceptance of issues.

Healthy teams have conflict and don't run from it. They engage and stay in the conversation no matter how long it takes to work through the issue. You as the leader must forge this pathway and lead by example. Click To Tweet

I’ve experienced these side effects more times then I’d like to admit, especially in my early years of leading. I used to deal with a lot of insecurity and fear. I still do at times, if I’m honest.

Are you wondering how you rate in your passivity and willingness to confront issues on your team? Let’s hold a mirror up for a minute.

Answer these two questions:

1. How often do you have open, honest, and sometimes uncomfortable conversations with your team? My friend Chris Tofilon, says that if you’re not experiencing any pressure—you’re probably not truly leading. (Wow! So true.)

2. Do you find that your team is open and honest with one another? The way they act towards you and one another is a reflection of how you act. If you avoid having constructive conversations, your band and singers are likely to act the same way. Of course, there are exceptions to this, but passivity is an easy pattern for your team to slip into if they see you leading this way.

Don’t let passivity or fear prevent you from finding the gold in your team. Take the time to confront areas of growth and character development as they arise in your team. Click To Tweet

Healthy teams have conflict and don’t run from it. They engage and stay in the conversation no matter how long it takes to work through the issue. You as the leader must forge this pathway and lead by example.

Don’t let passivity or fear prevent you from finding the gold in your team. Take the time to confront areas of growth and character development as they come up. Ultimately, you’ll find it only strengthens the places you go together in the Lord and as a team.

I’d love to hear your feedback below.

Huge thanks to my friend Jordan Vanderplate for letting me use this photo of Mills Lake at Rocky Mountain National Park. Check out more of his work here.

8 comments

  1. Another great article! This is the stuff that great leaders and great worship bands are made from. Communication will bring deeper, authentic expression which translates to musical syncronicity.

  2. Carolyn Ehman

    This is such a great blog post, Justin! I agree wholeheartedly with your assessment and exhortation to open, healthy, loving conversations! The most growth I have ever experienced has been in Christian communities that expected and demonstrated honest, loving feedback. Thank you for your insights and vulnerability in sharing. So encouraging, and it applies to every area of our lives with people!

  3. Caryn Steward

    Yikesa stripesa!
    Lately I have been applying these principles in the marketplace. I have found what you are teaching here to be true. In the past I would do just about anything to avoid conflict and I would let people get away with things and think it was my job to just forgive etc.
    They could say mean things or be dishonest and I would just act like they were okay and let it go. It was so frustrating to live like that. I have found it to be so refreshing to immediately deal with these things. I am still not as on target as I need to be. It takes practice to work on every conversation becoming an honest one instead of acting like the naked King has clothes on to avoid conflict. Now it is becoming kind of fun as the Lord gives me creative ways to get all the cards on the table so we can make some progress with the different issues. I am experiencing a new level of the respect you talk about.
    Plus I don’t have to end up frustrated and angry because people keep getting away with the same things over and over again.
    Caryn

  4. So true! I failed multiple times on this topic. But once I had a team and a couple would often be late half an hour. Rest of the team got mad and this time I confronted them. Several times, in a friendly manner but he didn’t want to change. The team doesn’t exist any longer (not only because of this, but it had it’s impact.) I still don’t know how I could’ve done better.

    1. Justin Rizzo

      Thanks for your comment, Katherina. Sounds like you did a good job pursuing honest feedback with your team and holding the line. Great job.