In my post, The Paradox of Investing in Others: How Passing the Torch Makes You Burn More Brightly, I talked about the value and necessity of training and raising up other worship leaders.

You should never be the only worship leader on your team. Ideally, at any point in time, you want several others on your team who are able to lead worship or who are moving toward that goal.

WORSHIP LEADERS: Being generous with your time and talents not only makes others better, but it makes you a better, more valuable leader. Click To Tweet

Though it might make you feel insecure to think about preparing others to do what you are doing, the reality is that being generous with your time and talents not only makes others better, but it makes you a better, more valuable leader.

Here are seven practical ways to help other worship leaders around you to grow:

1. Spend time with them.

They don’t have to be your best friends, but it takes time to invest in others. Also, the time doesn’t always have to be spent outside of your normal worship team routine. Focusing on them during practice, sound check, and sets is a great way to build relationships and invest into them as leaders.

2. Invest in them spiritually.

Share the spiritual side of what you do as a worship leader. Share what you’re thinking and feeling spiritually. Encourage them to share things they’re feeling from the Lord during sets and whenever your team is gathered. If you have a worship team bible study, invite them into your planning session. Better yet, help them prepare to teach and lead the team Bible study on their own occasionally.

3. Build them up with practical encouragement.

Point out strengths you see, musically, spiritually, and as a leader. When you encourage them (and this goes for EVERYONE in ANY craft), don’t say things like “I don’t want you to get a big head” or “Now, don’t let this go to your head.” That’s actually degrading and is not how God relates to us. He lavishes love and encouragement on us. God is really good at keeping people (including you) humble. We don’t need to try and do His job!

Worship Leaders: If you neglect opportunities to pour into others, you run the risk of becoming stagnant and lifeless. Constantly be looking for ways you can teach and train others by sharing things you've learned. Click To Tweet
4. Share honestly with them about areas in which they need to grow.

In the same way that you’re going to be encouraging them, share areas you feel they can grow in as well. Sometimes I’ll email these thoughts in a bullet point list, other times I’ll have a quick meeting with the person. If you have specific resources to recommend such as the name of a voice coach, music instructor, a helpful book, or an online article, pass that on as well. Recommending these resources and then what they follow through on will also give you a pretty good idea of how hungry they are to grow as a worship leader.

5. Invite them into leadership meetings.

If your pastor or leader is okay with it, invite worship leaders you’re investing in into leadership meetings that they typically don’t attend. This doesn’t have to be every time, but even once in a while can give them an idea of what goes on behind the scenes and make them feel part of your leadership team.

6. Give them opportunities to lead worship.

Let rising worship leaders on your team have an opportunity to lead a set while you participate as a singer or even just sit in the room and engage in worship and/or observe your team from the point of view of those in the congregation. This is also a great practical thing to do so that when you are sick, out of town, or just need to rest your voice, you will have an experienced leader waiting in the wings who knows your team dynamics and has the ability to lead.

7. Give them opportunities to lead offstage.

Call on them to pray for the team or share a scripture or encouragement before a set. The goal is to help them feel comfortable speaking in front of the team and carrying out some of the duties of a full-fledged team leader. Invite them to assist with auditions, bible studies, practices, or administrative duties (ordering team Bible study materials, copying music and lyrics, or organizing a social event for the team).

The bottom line is that investing in others on your team is beneficial to both of you. If you neglect opportunities to pour into others, you run the risk of becoming stagnant and lifeless. Constantly be looking for ways you can teach and train others by sharing things you have learned as a worship leader.

Remember, your goal is not only to be your best, but to help others to become the best they can be as well. This is the mark of a great leader.

Huge thanks to my friend Jordan Vanderplate for letting me use this photo of Beaver Springs, PA. Check out more of his work here.


I’m Justin Rizzo. I’m a worship leader, songwriter, and recording artist. I want to help you achieve your highest potential and walk out with confidence everything you’ve been made for.









0 comments

0 Shares
Share via
%d bloggers like this: