Many things can hinder us from pursuing healthy community on our team.

Time, for instance. You’ve probably had the thought, “I just don’t have the time to connect with all of these people.” Maybe it’s the fear of being vulnerable or spreading ourselves too thin. It can even be as simple as personality differences on the team.

If any of these things resonate with you, I encourage you to talk with the Lord about it. You might even connect with a friend, mentor, or pastor to talk through some things.

WORSHIP LEADERS: Avoidance can postpone having to deal with some issues in your life, but it will rarely solve them. Click To Tweet

Avoidance can postpone having to deal with some issues in our lives, but it rarely solves them. And avoiding leading others in community due to insecurities or fears is neither healthy nor helpful. If you avoid meaningful relationships with your team members (even unknowingly) by simply keeping your interactions limited to small talk and you never really open up your heart to them, eventually this will lead to challenges on the team.

No matter how well you lead your team spiritually, your life in the Word and your passion for Jesus will only take you so far before people begin to wonder who you really are. If you can’t open up and be a real person with them, they won’t follow you for very long.

No matter how well you lead your team spiritually, your life in the Word and your passion for Jesus will only take you so far before people begin to wonder who you really are. Open up and be real with your team. Click To Tweet

Just as you don’t want lip service from a friend, you don’t want a shallow surface-level relationship with that teammate across the room. My team needs to know me to the extent that I know them. This doesn’t mean that you are going to be best friends with everyone on your team. You will connect with some people more naturally than you do with others. But it does mean that you should be purposefully trying to share your heart with them.

Instead of the revelation you got on a Scripture verse or the latest worship song that inspired you, try talking about what you and your spouse did on your most recent date night, or something you are struggling with. This type of sharing goes a long way.

A leader who doesn’t open up his or her heart will only have a following for so long. It is a challenge to follow a leader who only talks about spiritual things without ever mentioning normal, everyday things.

A leader who doesn’t open up his or her heart will only have a following for so long. It is a challenge to follow a leader who only talks about spiritual things without ever mentioning normal, everyday things. Click To Tweet

As the worship leader, you’re a spiritual leader to your team. People may respect you as a spiritual authority, but if you don’t also come across as a human being who has real thoughts, feelings, and emotions about life, you can begin to seem untrustworthy to people. It is difficult to respect a worship leader you’ve seen for years but have never had a normal conversation with.

Think about your favorite preacher. Though he may have amazing Bible knowledge and share with authority, one of the things that draws us to preachers is often the stories they tell about their personal lives. This is one of the most effective means of communication.

Allowing oneself to be known by being real, vulnerable, and, at times, transparent is worth the investment of time and energy required.

When I am unapproachable to my team, I actually limit my effectiveness as a leader. If my own team does not feel that they can relate to me and I to them, we are limited in where we can go together.

Allowing oneself to be known by being real, vulnerable, and, at times, transparent is worth the investment of time and energy required. Click To Tweet

My ability to effectively lead a room full of worshipers to explore the mysteries of God through music requires an intimacy and vulnerability that will be difficult to achieve if the team playing and singing with me is completely disconnected with who I am on a personal level.

Honesty and authenticity in my leading both on stage and off is absolutely essential to having a healthy, thriving worship team.

Would love to hear your comments on this below.

Huge thanks to my friend Jordan Vanderplate for letting me use this photo of Glasson, England. Check out more of his work here.


I’m Justin Rizzo. I enable worship leaders who feel isolated, overworked, and unfocused to experience peace, confidence and create thriving worship communities.







I’m Still Saying Yes (Spontaneous)



4 comments

  1. Norman Peterson

    Absolutely the path to intimacy and growth. Easier in some aspects for our team (Wellspring) as four out of six of us are family and live together. Family dynamics often get difficult as we all know, perhaps it is a pattern for teams methods. The hard part is getting started and not leading off with “..now don’t take this as condemnation BUT…” No negative debriefs after a set, let any issues or problems sort out sans emotion and it might be easier to have a real conversation rather than a lecture, sermon or a fix it solution. LISTEN and be attentive.

  2. This is great reminder. It’s so easy to feel the pressure to lead spiritually and give directions that I can forget to just be normal. Thank you for sharing!

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